Duvar English

Vacationers around Turkey are preparing for Eid al-Adha, the Muslim sacrifice feast, amid a continuing COVID-19 risk and warnings to minimize social traffic.

Passengers wearing masks disembark from a ferry in western Bandırma.

Bus terminals in large cities filled up on July 29 with residents who wished to leave town for the holiday, possibly to join extended family for the traditional holiday.

Cars line up on the highway in Bolu that serves as a connection between the western part of the country and the Anatolian mainland.

Duvar columnist Metin Yeğin said that he took a plane into Istanbul’s smaller Sabiha Gökçen Airport, where he said passengers were unable to maintain safe distances and weren’t seated distantly on the plane either.

Passengers in Istanbul’s Sabiha Gökçen Airport crowd the baggage claim area.

Meanwhile, shoppers in Istanbul flooded the streets to do holiday shopping for sweets, traditionally served in family gatherings during the feast.

A woman in Istanbul shops for Turkish delight.

Relatives of soldiers and public servants who died on duty visited cemeteries on July 29, a day before Eid al-Adha Eve, to pray at their loved ones’ graves, a tradition before Muslim holidays.

A man sits by a grave to pray on July 29.

Turkey’s dessert industry has also been busy before the holiday, as traditional desserts are a popular item on holiday tables.

Baklava vendors in Muş prepare trays of baklava before Eid al-Adha.

Turkey started its normalization process on June 1, lifting curfews, removing travel restrictions and resuming business as usual.

The country’s daily COVID-19 diagnoses spiked following the start of the normalization process, stabilizing around the high 900s.